As anyone who has applied for or received grant funding can attest, there is no one magic formula to securing financial support, but there are certain methods that have proven to be successful.

In the book “How to Say It: Grantwriting,” Deborah S. Koch offers certain guidelines that have stood up as basics in the quest for funding.

For one thing, Koch argues, if you cannot establish that there is an unquestionable need for the work you propose to do, then the proposal ought to stop right there.

Further:

  • Clarify your issue. Your organization’s purpose is associated with an issue; it is the reason your organization exists. There is a substantial issue that you think needs extra attention.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the field. A reviewer must trust that your expression of need is accurate so the person can feel confident about what you propose to do.
  • Present your problem-solving approach. Once the statement of needs has been established, you must present a convincing argument for why what you are proposing is necessary.
  • Talk about the beneficiaries. Convince the reader that the designated population needs the intervention, will benefit from it and is a population one should care about.
  • Establish organizational capacity to meet the need. It is important to show the connection between your organization’s work and the issue the grant-maker wants addressed.

Also check out Deborah’s 8 Ideas for Making Your Program Fundable.

courtesy NonProfit Times

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