Not Only for Ourselves

an editorial from The Jewish Daily Forward:

The story was heart-warming, but instructive in an unexpected way. Jewish families gathered on a Sunday in a warehouse to pack boxes of pasta, canned vegetables and other food supplies and deliver them to needy residents in their region. Parents brought their children to reinforce the message of helping others. A brief dvar Torah was offered, to reinforce another message, that this was not just charity, it was tzedekah, a Jewish expression of communal commitment.

One problem: Deep into the story, as it was written in a community newspaper, we learned that when a certain family tried to deliver their boxes to residents of a federation-owned housing project, almost no one was at home to receive them.

The fact that the mission was not accomplished, that the needy were not served, was an afterthought in this classic presentation of a Jewish service activity.

Obviously, it is difficult to criticize these well-intentioned behaviors. All of us who have ever dragged our children to food warehouses and soup kitchens, park clean-ups and nursing home visits, try to model a kind of citizenship that is essential to maintaining American civic life. More and more, service activities are also regarded as a powerful tool to shore up Jewish identity and values, especially for a generation accustomed to bar mitzvah projects, high school service programs and the kavod they receive for trying to do good in the world.

But elevating Jewish identity to a goal of such efforts undermines their very purpose. “Service programs that exist and are being created will be successful if, first and foremost, they are about service to others and not about strengthening ourselves,” said Ruth Messinger, who as president of American Jewish World Service is considered a doyenne of well-run service programs. She said this in a recent talk at the opening of the Berman Jewish Policy Archive at New York University, and her important remarks deserve a greater audience.

“Service to others,” she reminded, “is built into Jewish tradition, but it has always been focused on the needs of the beneficiaries, not the volunteers.”

The misguided tendency to conflate the two aims is not only a problem in the Jewish world. For years, the broader national service community has sought to balance the welcome desire of Americans to serve with the most efficient, thoughtful and respectful way of channeling those energies so that they are not wasted, or worse. Because it must be acknowledged that service, if done poorly, can result in more harm than good. It can denigrate or ignore the real needs of the served, and leave the server demoralized and cynical. This is already happening in places where “service learning” is organized cheaply and haphazardly, leaving students to conclude they are wasting their time while polishing their resumes.

Messinger’s remonstrations contained a second, equally important point, that acts of service must be linked to learning about and working to change the conditions that brought about the need in the first place. She calls it social justice. Others may call it active citizenship. Whatever the nomenclature, the point is direct: It’s not enough to serve food in the soup kitchen. We must confront the root causes of hunger and work toward addressing the greater need.

This is not a partisan observation. The volunteer in a deprived public school may be of great help in the classroom, but just as importantly, she is likely witnessing, first-hand, the breakdown in public education in America. Her solution may be to advocate for more government funding, or it may be to push for school vouchers. The essential act here is understanding that even though individual children are aided by her volunteer efforts, the system will not improve unless the underlying conditions are addressed by government and society.

“Service has to be about making change in communities, not about making changes in me,” noted David Rosenn, executive director of Avodah, another well-regarded service program. “The last thing we want the Jewish community to do is use communities in distress as a vehicle to build identity.”

This editorial originally appeared in The Jewish Daily Forward; reprinted with permission.

Print Friendly
Send to Kindle

Comments

  1. Sara says

    Aside from the important note that service must serve those who we intend to help, the idea of “good intentions” is simply not enough from a Jewish perspective. Although a very American approach to being proactive in treating the worlds ills, this action without change is not enouugh. In writing social welfare programs and “mitzva projects” both in the US and Israel, the idea that if the plan will not provide an actual service it is simply not worth carrying out as a practice in making the service provider feel good from their altruism.

  2. Gary says

    “But elevating Jewish identity to a goal of such efforts undermines their very purpose.” (From the editorial above)

    Had the editor said “the goal” instead of “a goal” perhaps I would have agreed. Even Ruth Messinger sees service programs as having an objective of strengthening Jewish identity. World Jewish Service points proudly to its website that provides texts from the tradition to support its work as a means of fostering greater Jewish identity. http://www.on1foot.org/ Our tradition does not shy away from advancing multiple agendas while performing mitzvot. Hillel’s dictum suggests we need to be both for ourselves and for others…I suggest it applies as much to the community as a whole as to the individual. And it also applies when we perform mitzvot including those pertaining to social justice. Yes, service to others should be primary…but must it be exclusive?